UDC History

The United Daughters of the Confederacy is the outgrowth of many local memorial, monument, and Confederate home associations and auxiliaries to camps of United Confederate Veterans that were organized after the War Between the States. It is the oldest patriotic organization in our country because of its connection with two statewide organizations that came into existence as early as 1890 — the Daughters of the Confederacy (DOC) in Missouri and the Ladies’ Auxiliary of the Confederate Soldiers Home in Tennessee.

The National Association of the Daughters of the Confederacy was organized in Nashville, Tenn., on September 10, 1894, by founders Mrs. Caroline Meriwether Goodlett of Nashville and Mrs. Anna Davenport Raines of Georgia. At its second meeting in Atlanta, Ga., in 1895, the Organization changed its name to the United Daughters of the Confederacy. The United Daughters of the Confederacy was incorporated under the laws of the District of Columbia on July 18, 1919.

Objectives

The objectives of the organization are Historical, Educational, Benevolent, Memorial and Patriotic:

  • To collect and preserve the material necessary for a truthful history of the War Between the States and to protect, preserve, and mark the places made historic by Confederate valor
  • To assist descendants of worthy Confederates in securing a proper education
  • To fulfill the sacred duty of benevolence toward the survivor of the War and those dependent upon them
  • To honor the memory of those who served and those who fell in the service of the Confederate States of America
  • To record the part played during the War by Southern women, including their patient endurance of hardship, their patriotic devotion during the struggle, and their untiring efforts during the post-War reconstruction of the South
  • To cherish the ties of friendship among the members of the Organization

“Why I Am a Daughter of the Confederacy”

I am a Daughter of the Confederacy because I was born a Daughter of the Confederacy. A part of my heritage was that I came into this world with the blood of a soldier in my veins…a soldier who may have had nothing more to leave behind to me and to those who come after me except in heritage…a heritage so rich in honor and glory that it far surpasses any material wealth that could be mine. But it is mine, to cherish, to nurture and to make grace, and to pass along to those yet to come.  I am, therefore, a Daughter of the Confederacy because it is my birthright.

I am a Daughter of the Confederacy because I have an obligation to perform. Like the man in the Bible, I was given a talent and it is my duty to do something about it. That is why I’ve joined a group of ladies whose birthright is the same as mine…an organization which has for its purpose the continuance and furtherance of the true history of the South and the ideals of southern womanhood as embodied in its Constitution.

I am a member of The United Daughters of the Confederacy because I feel it would greatly please my ancestor to know that I am a member. It would please him to know that I appreciate what he did and delight his soldier love to know that I do not consider the cause which he held so dear to be lost or forgotten. Rather, I am extremely proud of the fact that he was a part of it and was numbered among some of the greatest and bravest men which any such cause ever produced.

I am a Daughter of the Confederacy because I can no more help being a Daughter of the Confederacy than I can help being an American, and I feel that I was greatly favored by inheriting a birthright for both.

Written by Mary Nowlin Moon (Mrs. John)
A member of Kirkwood Otey Chapter 10, Lynchburg, Virginia
First read at a Chapter meeting on June 2, 1915